Chunkzz (2017) Malayalam Movie Review – Veeyen


‘Chunkzz’ is a catastrophic celebration of sexist jokes that will have you running for cover. In his second directorial venture after ‘Happy Wedding’, Omar Lulu tries his luck with the same trite formula once again, and scores further down the rung.


‘Chunkzz’ is a catastrophic celebration of sexist jokes that will have you running for cover. In his second directorial venture after ‘Happy Wedding’, Omar Lulu tries his luck with the same trite formula once again, and scores further down the rung.

The stage has been set yet again in a college by Lulu, where four young guys (Balu Varghese, Dharmajan Bolgatty, Ganapathy, and Vishak Nair) are seen generally having a blast. Along comes Riya (Honey Rose) and she creates a flutter in no time, and with Sherin (Marina Michael) making a bullet entry, things for a toss.

‘Chunkzz’ has a story line that needs to be uncovered from a debris of sequences that vacillate between the tedious and the plain vexing.  It does go without saying that on retrospect it even seems impossible that a film that runs for a couple of hours could be generated from an almost indiscernible thread line as the one in it.

Perhaps it would be too much to expect a film as this to keep the sexism in check, but ‘Chunkzz’ blatantly flaunts it to the point of revolting. It’s a male carnival without doubt, where the men seem to be having all the fun, and where the women prance around as eye candy material, despite all the suggestions otherwise.

‘Chunkzz’ is a roller coaster ride, but not the kind that you would enjoy, an which would have you screaming in excitement, with the air blowing against your face and the speed that sends a thrill down your spine. Rather, it’s one of those rides that jolt and joggle you around, the one that makes you a bit woozy and leaves you wanting to jump off your cab.

It’s pretty obvious that the scenes and situations in the film have been tailor made to raise those laughs, and while there are very few that actually succeed in doing so, the majority of them are embarrassingly unengaging. Nothing else seems to matter either – neither the plot nor the characters in it – and ultimately it strikes you as a long series of over stretched gags that appear one after the other.

These are the improvisational laughs that I am talking about – the kind that is generated at the very last moment when a scene is finally being canned – and while it does work in some films, it falls miserably flat in others. And when it falters in the writing itself, there is little that the cast or anyone else can do about it.

When it comes to performances, more is often seen as better in ‘Chunkzz’. Almost every male  actor plays it to the rooftops, and veteran performers Lal and Siddique are caught in this boisterous melee by the youth brigade. The women actors are far more composed, and Honey and Merina try hard, but in vain, to tone down the decibels a bit.

If we have actually started believing that this is the kind of humour that makes a film enormously enjoyable, perhaps we are headed straight for a bit of a mess. And when would we realize once and for all, that without some basic relatability, there would hardly be anything memorable or cherished about a film?


Verdict: Tiresome


 

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