Mikhael (2019) Malayalam Movie Review – Veeyen


The macho rhythm that Adeni attempts to work up with ‘Mikhael’ is the kind that could be passable at the moment, but forgettable soon after. Which is why despite all its attempts to be a swanky action flick, it strikes you as a charade more than anything else.  


lam-movie-review-veeyen

There is a factory mould that filmmaker Haneef Adeni seems to have crafted, and his latest film ‘Mikhael’ unconcernedly, almost lifelessly fits into it. When he names his protagonist as Mikhael, it isn’t exactly a reassuring thought, and the deluge of overt and veiled references to the Bible that floods the film in no time, proves you are right.

This is the violent, gory film that you would probably expect, given Adeni’s filmography and the director casts Nivin Pauly in the title role, of a doctor who has quite a few special skills stacked up his sleeve. Clever, except that it has come to a point where the audience has started making even cleverer guesses as to what could actually be laid out in Adeni’s surgical tray.

lam-movie-review-veeyen

No prizes for guessing that Adeni’s protagonist has an axe to grind, and that quite alike his predecessors in films as ‘The Great Father’ and ‘Abrahaminte Santhathikal’, the man does not offer a cheek for a slap on the other. Instead, he lunges at the law of the land and goes at it with a brute force, determined to destroy anything that comes his way.

For a film as this to work, despite all the inconsistencies that the script is riddled with, the action has to impress. And ‘Mikhael’ at times has instances of outrageous action that suggest that the film has taken itself a bit too seriously, and that all the slow motion attributed to almost all the actors – left, right and centre –serves as a time killer and nothing else.

There is the momentous scene when Mikhael sees red and gets busy throwing off a few men who have unfortunately decided to cross paths with him. An unconvincing Nivin Pauly who casually mumbles into the phone, while seeing to it that no adversary ribs are left unbroken, reminds you of a dragonfly that tries hard to lift a rock off the floor.

lam-movie-review-veeyen

The stylisation is something that Adeni films cannot do away with, and with ‘Mikhael, the director seems to have taken it up a few notches further up. But beneath all the pizzazz is a story-line that is beset with embroidery and embellishments, and a string of characters who have no idea where they have come from, or where they are headed.

Adeni’s definition of male machismo continues to be visually expressed in the film, and is likely to raise quite a few eye brows. There is no end to the swagger and bluster that is on show, and no end to the arcane dialogues that are seeped in multiple philosophical references, that ultimately end up all over the place.

lam-movie-review-veeyen

One cannot help being aghast at how heavy Pauly appears to be in the film, and while it could very well be a part of the scheme to shed his boyish charms, it hardly works in favour of the film. Appearing in stark contrast to Pauly’s full self, is a dapper looking Unni Mukundan who seems to have chiseled himself to perfection.

There is also a whole range of accomplished actors occupying the fringes of the plotline, be it KPAC  Lalitha  or Suraj Venjarammoodu, Chakravarthy or Sudev Nair, Siddique or Santhi Krishna. That hardly any one of them would be remembered after the film, talks of the characterization, more than the acting prowess that all these actors have so efficiently flaunted on multiple occasions in the past.

The macho rhythm that Adeni attempts to work up with ‘Mikhael’ is the kind that could be passable at the moment, but forgettable soon after. Which is why despite all its attempts to be a swanky action flick, it strikes you as a charade more than anything else.


Verdict: Average


Loading Facebook Comments ...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *