Porinchu Mariam Jose (2019) Malayalam Movie Review – Veeyen


‘Porinchu Mariam Jose’ does not have specific points where it starts losing its way. Rather the antique tale that it narrates usurps both the aspirations of its maker and the efforts of its terrific cast, rendering it a stylized cinematic piece that is bracing to look at, but which sounds obsolete to the core.


There is no compromise on the grandeur of the canvas, when it’s a film maker as Joshi at the helm of affairs, and ‘Porinchu Mariam Jose’ very readily instils an awe in us with its spectacular initial frames. Suggesting that it has quite an elaborate story to tell, the film starts off with its three lead characters – Porinchu, Mariam and Jose – in school, even as its opening credits continue to roll.

A couple of decades later, the three of them have matured beyond recognition, and while Kattalan Porinchu (Joju George) has emerged as a dreaded thug, Mariam (Nyla Usha) has sashayed into adulthood as a hardcore money lender and a gorgeous one, at that. Jose (Chemban Vinod Jose) too, not one to be left behind, has earned a name for himself as the local disco dancer who shakes much more than a leg at the church festival.

Essentially a film about friendship, love and revenge, ‘Porinchu Mariam Jose’ makes a jump start, but gets stuck in a rut soon after. There could be a couple of reasons that could be attributed to it, the former one being that it tells a tale that is as old as cinema itself, and the latter one being that not much has been altered in its cinematic landscape to retain its appeal.

‘Porinchu Mariam Jose’ is all about Porinchu, than the other two characters, whom we believe deserved a much better share of the screen. That said, it’s a pleasure to watch the menace that gleams away in Porinchu’s eyes, as he has a go at a group of assailants with a bamboo pole and sends them scampering away like rats out in daylight.

But this is the reason for the film’s downfall as well, and while Mariam finally just about emerges from Porinchu’s shadows, Jose makes do with the few scenes that he is offered, so much so that this film eventually strikes you as a Porinchu show all the way. This is also the reason that makes you feel that the script’s obsession with Porinchu at the cost of the other two is the raison d’être behind the film’s collapse.

And yet, when the half time title card that is a whopper comes up, you refuse to let your hopes be downed and wait for some massive action to sweep you over. Predictability runs water all over your plans, and while the film does struggle and attempt a resurge with a knocker of a climax, much water has already flowed by, and the boats have already been sunk.

‘Porinchu Mariam Jose’ has exceptionally fine performances from all its three leads, and while Joju easily wins us over with his intimidating act, Nyla exudes an effervescent charm that is exuberant. I loved Chemban Vinod Jose in this one, and he also happens to be my personal favourite of the three, despite being accorded with some unproductive writing. There are also noteworthy performances from Vijayaraghavan, Sudhi Koppa and Rahul Madhav to boot.

This is a film that asserts without any further doubt that Joshi stands apart from the rest of his league as a film maker who has taken serious note of how the cinematic medium has transformed over the years. ‘Porinchu Mariam Jose’ is chicly packaged and deftly designed and coming from a film maker who had made his directorial debut forty one years back, this is a commendable achievement that deserves a huge round of applause. Ajay David Kachappilly’s frames are ornately spectacular and the musical score by Jakes Bijoy exquisite, with the ‘Neela Maalaakhe..’ track being my personal pick from the lot.

‘Porinchu Mariam Jose’ does not have specific points where it starts losing its way. Rather the antique tale that it narrates usurps both the aspirations of its maker and the efforts of its terrific cast, rendering it a stylized cinematic piece that is bracing to look at, but which sounds obsolete to the core.


Verdict: Average


Loading Facebook Comments ...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *