Thobama (2018) Malayalam Movie Review – Veeyen


‘Thobama’ is at best, an adequate spin on a theme that we are more than familiar with. There isn’t much of a push for diversity here, and it lists and meanders for a while, leaving a flicker here and there, before finally drifting away.


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Mohsin Kassim’s ‘Thobama’ offers a throwback of sorts, and it is inevitable that you end up thinking of the day when you had watched Alphonse Puthren’s ‘Premam’ on screens. There has obviously been a few role changes and with Puthren donning the mantle of the producer this time around, ‘Thobama’, despite a few familiar faces that have been carried over from the much loved film, is in no way comparable to the crowd pleaser that ‘Premam’ was.

No prizes for guessing that the unique title of the film owes its origin to the names of its three protagonists – Thommy (Sharafudheen), Balu (Siju Wilson) and Mammu (Krishna Sankar) – who have been thick friends for long. Of the three, Balu has had a comfortable upbringing, while Thommy had been through quite a few personal struggles himself. Mammu has his hopes fixed on the silver screen, and aspires to be an actor some day.

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To put things into perspective, what is perhaps most appreciable about ‘Thobama’ is Kassim’s genuine attempts to make it a film that is dissimilar to ‘Premam’. ‘Thobama’ is in many ways different from the fluffy, cloud candy entertainer that ‘Premam’ was, and yet cannot help flaunting its very obvious similarities.

It’s a lack of focus that works against ‘Thobama’ and its strikes you as a film that has its fingers dipped in too many bowls, all at once. The sub tracks play out in all earnestness, but grow progressively feeble, until it comes to a point where it eventually ends up all over the place, in the latter half.

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There is a romantic track that ‘Thobama’ fleetingly shows an interest in, and just when you start wondering where it is all headed, it fizzles out without as much as a whimper. It is one of the many asides that the film chooses to prolifically indulge in, before losing interest and moving on to something else.

‘Thobama’ also has a climax that is likely to bring up diverse impressions. It all comes down to the essential question that hundreds of young men before ‘Thobama’ have painfully considered – that of minting some easy money – and there is hardly anything that is inventive in here, that would make you prop up your head in anticipation.

The three young actors – Siju Wilson, Sharafudheen and Krishna Sankar – smoothly deliver the goods, and through efficient performances ensure that ‘Thobama’ is a no-hassle watch. Though her role is far from ingenious, Punya Elizabeth does a neat job at what she has been offered and decidedly leaves a mark. Shabareesh, Rajesh Sharma and Sreelekshmi are around in supporting roles.

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Kassim does however establish sans doubt, that there is some indisputable talent in there that should hopefully be unearthed in his successive directorial endeavours. It all happens almost a decade back, and for the most part the not-so-distant-past is resourcefully recreated, paying attention to the particulars.

‘Thobama’ is at best, an adequate spin on a theme that we are more than familiar with. There isn’t much of a push for diversity here, and it lists and meanders for a while, leaving a flicker here and there, before finally drifting away.


Verdict: Average


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