Kamuki (2018) Malayalam Movie Review – Veeyen


To title a film as ‘Kamuki’ and then have the loud mouthed girl protagonist have a bumpy landing on earth and that too in an auto rickshaw doesn’t sound that right.  One of the initial precursors to a long-winding saga of extremities and stale jokes,  here is a sequence that spells it out loud and clear that not everything is okay in love and war.


kamuki-malayalam-movie-review-veeyen

Phew! To title a film as ‘Kamuki’ and then have the loud mouthed girl protagonist have a bumpy landing on earth and that too in an auto rickshaw doesn’t sound that right.  One of the initial precursors to a long-winding saga of extremities and stale jokes,  here is a sequence that spells it out loud and clear that not everything is okay in love and war.

Achamma (Aparna Balamurali) hasn’t had it easy, sauntering through what she herself considers a tough teenage, and finally in college runs into a visually challenged young man Hari (Askar Ali), who makes her change the glasses that she has been wearing all along. Love strikes, and while Hari has quite a few qualms, Achamma is determined to convince him otherwise.

kamuki-malayalam-movie-review-veeyen

Despite a very feminine title that is expected to spill out vibes of a sugared romance if not anything else, ‘Kamuki’ emerges to be entirely something else, far away from all our anticipations. For one, the women in it are strained caricatures that cater to the requirements of a very obvious, distinctly male psyche.

There’s perhaps a bit too much of focus on female anatomy in the film, and it all comes down eventually to the size of a woman’s endowments. What is sardonic is the fact that Achamma is no ordinary, coy girl and is on the contrary quite the opposite of a conventional Indian lass. Yet, the film in which she is the protagonist reeks of sexism throughout.

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‘Kamuki’ is crammed with the tedious stuff that makes up such films – the usual crushes, ogling, and what not, and the umpteen yawn inducing references to several successful romantic capers that have had their say at the box office. Nothing much works though, and everything seems to be staged.

The redeeming factor in ‘Kamuki’ is the girl falling for a visually challenged man, and you hope that things would get brighter thereon. Further disappointments await, and the film trudges on without as much as a respite in sight and very soon ends up an imminently forgettable affair with a few insensitive laughs thrown in here and there.

There is a whole lot of transformation that Achamma goes through in the latter half that is bound to make you roll your eyes in astonishment. The script rants on all through, and cinematically nothing much alters and it all at long last leads down to a grand finale that doesn’t let the weather change much either.

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Aparna Balamurali and Askar Ali are effective as the leads – especially the former, who has by now established without doubt that even the worst scripted of roles are safe in her hands. Askar is good as well and so is Baiju in a key role, and there are several other supporting actors – known and unknown faces – some of whom even play it up to the galleries.

‘Kamuki’ is a severe drop down for the director, and the key lessons in ‘Kamuki’ – unearthing the deep inner self that lies beyond the physical beauty or whatever – are lost in the muddle. Perhaps there is indeed a more complex intent than all this but at the end of the day, very little of it is passed down across the screens.


Verdict: Tedious


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